12 December 2017

Chilly childish cheek

A 55 minute cold walk to collect the re-clutched car from the crazily inaccessible location of the repairer my insurer sent to rescue me, and still limping, and increasingly as the long march proceeded, from the effect on my left knee of the fall that broke my right arm three weeks ago; and as I held that fence to negotiate carefully a patch of ice, terrified of a further fall, a young girl following on from that group of schoolchildren seen here descending the stairs from the railway bridge ahead, said to me, "Oh bless your little cotton socks old fella, now watch you don't fall," but more in cheek rather than genuine concern, I felt. Thus I have become the butt of "old geezer" type remarks, of the sort, I admit, I have delivered myself, probably in the early seventies, perhaps not directly to the geezers concerned but certainly with a laugh amongst my young friends. Then I thought of what these children have ahead of them, probably, perhaps... the struggles, the challenges, the first times for so many new things, and I sighed, and felt glad that was all behind me, although two miles of icy roadway still lay ahead. I made it, little cotton socks and all, although darkness had descended by then.

10 comments:

  1. Clever idea: cotton socks.
    Why didn't you take a taxi, though?

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  2. Much of the way was on a road with bus stops and I had planned to catch a bus using the free pass that anyone of my age has, and I kept looking back for one approaching, but no bus ever approached. Now I am home I can see an online timetable advising me they only run in the mornings and early evening. My planning was clearly inverted, therefore useless. Thus I walked on a hopeful quest for a bus, blissfully unaware that no bus would ever come, but walking on hopefully was better than knowing for sure that the quest was hopeless. But in any case, taxis are not part of my lifestyle - I'd rather walk unless completely unable. I am a somewhat stubborn old git.

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  3. By the way, I was not wearing little cotton socks - it's just an expression of endearment (fake endearment in this case, I rather expect).

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  4. Well, a bus did not come to my mind as you mentioned a 'crazily inaccessible location'. As for taxis: I remember two occasions: One in the very early 70s, during which I took off my "best shirt" so that my friend would not vomit on the seats, and one in 1988 in a London Taxi, from Buckingham Palace to Scotland Yard, to make an eleven year old boy happy.
    Hope your car is in the garage, and you sar sitting near your fire place. Take good care not only of knee and arm, 'old fella'.

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  5. Ah ha ha ha, so no cotton socks over your shoes/boots. Still, it would have been clever. :)

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  6. Sigh.
    I have done that bus thing more than once. I can wait - or I can walk. And mostly I walk. Fortunately with no-one blessing the cotton socks I am not wearing.

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  7. And Sean is hoping my car is in the garage that I do not possess... Still, it is in my driveway, and I will assume he was not maliciously hoping it was still broken and therefore in the garage that does the repairs. And the mechanic no longer has a rather expensive rechargeable and powerful lamp, since I found he left it in my car. I suppose I will do the decent thing and return it to him, by driving to his location that is not so ridiculously inaccessible with a working vehicle to sit in.

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  8. And I am wondering (and doubting) that a shirt would be sufficiently absorbent for the lovely task Sean, with gritty resonance with Sir Walter Raleigh, set for it.

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  9. To begin with the end: The shirt did a good job, and ended in the nearest rubbish container. Interesting phenomenon, anyway, long-term memory.
    Well, and I am, of course, glad you could imagine me being not malicious.
    May the peace of the night be upon you, dear Andrew.

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  10. It reminds me of a two young girls that were mocking me a couple of weeks ago.

    I have quite short strides when I walk and on this particular day I had shoes with heels that made a clip clop noise as a walked along on the pavement. One of the girls in front started giggling and making exaggerated walks in time with my footsteps. Quite oblivious of the fact that I knew she was mocking me!

    Quite different from my experience today walking out of our local town on the icy paths. A gentleman stepped to one side to let me pass and as I did so he engaged me in conversation saying that the paths were lethal and that he had just fallen flat on his back whilst talking on his mobile phone. I heeded his thought and walked very carefully as I made my way back home.

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